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  • According to an article on the Reuters website, the high school graduation rate in the US is steadily increasing and is on pace to reach a 90% graduation rate by 2020. This is very exciting news, but comes with caveats. For example, the graduation rate of minority students falls far behind that of White students. One-third (33%) of African-American students and 29% of Hispanic students drop out of high school before graduation, In addition, students with limited fluency in English have a graduation rate of 25% in some states in the country.

     The article also noted that students with disabilities face significant barriers to graduation. The article stated that in Nevada, for example, only 23% of students with disabilities completed high school in 2011. This gave us the idea to look at the NCI data on completed education levels.

     The following results come from the 2011-2012 administration of the Adult Family Survey (AFS). The AFS is given to a family member of an individual with ID/DD. To be eligible for the survey, the individual with ID/DD must be living in the family home, must receive one publicly funded service in addition to case management, and must be over the age of 18. The data in this blog has not been analyzed for significance.

    The following table shows the highest education level achieved by individuals with ID/DD who had a family member respond to the AFS survey.

     

    Highest Education Level

    Percent of total N=4973

    Less than a High School Diploma/GED

    46%

    High School Diploma/GED

    49%

    Vocational School

    3%

    Some College

    1%

    College Degree

    1%


    As can be seen from this data, almost half did not graduate from high school.

    It is interesting to look at education by age of individual with ID/DD, as demonstrated in the below table:

     

    Highest Education Level

    Age Categories

    18-30

    31-50

    50+

    Less than a High School Diploma/GED

    38%

    49%

    78%

    High School Diploma/GED

    57%

    46%

    16%

    Vocational School

    2%

    5%

    3%

    Some College

    2%

    1%

    1%

    College Degree

    1%

    0%

    1%

     

    As can be seen from the above table, 57% of individuals with ID/DD between the ages of 18-30 have graduated from high school. Conversely, only 16% of individuals with ID/DD over the age of 50 have done so. This may be a testament to an increased emphasis on education and inclusion in ID/DD services.

     Interestingly, our data does not show differences in education level based on race/ethnicity.

     

    Highest Education Level

    Race/Ethnicity

    White

    African   American

    Latino

    Less than a High School Diploma/GED

    48%

    42%

    43%

    High School Diploma/GED

    47%

    52%

    50%

    Vocational School

    3%

    5%

    4%

    Some College

    2%

    1%

    2%

    College Degree

    1%

    0%

    2%

     

    As can be seen from the above table, the rate of individuals with ID/DD with High School Diplomas/GEDs does not vary much by race/ethnicity. In fact, contrary to the racial/ethnic disparities in graduation rates for non-disabled students noted in the Reuters article, White students seem to have earned their High School Diplomas/GEDs at a slightly lower rate than Latino and African American students. 

     We’d love to hear your thoughts and comments on this data.

     Please note: The 2011-12 data reports will be released and placed on the NCI website this Spring. For more in depth analysis of previous year’s NCI consumer survey data, please see http://www.nationalcoreindicators.org.

     

  • Valentine’s Day is a celebration of love and friendship. It’s also the perfect opportunity to look at NCI data regarding relationships and dating. The following data comes from the 2011-2012 Consumer Survey.

    The following table demonstrates the percentage of NCI respondents who have friends.

    Has Friends?

    Frequency

    Percentage of total

    No, does not have friends

    700

    8%

    Yes, all friends are staff or family, or cannot determine

    1786

    22%

    Yes, has friends who are not staff or family

    5892

    70%

    Total

    8378

    100%

     

    The following table demonstrates the percentage of respondents who have a best friend.

    Has a Best Friend?

    Frequency

    Percentage of total

    No

    1973

    25%

    Yes

    6081

    75 %

    Total

    8054

    100%

     

    The vast majority of respondents state that they have friends, and many say that they also have a best friend. However, one-quarter (25%) report that they do not have a best friend.

    The following table represents only those respondents who said that they DO NOT have friends. Fifty-nine percent of  those who do not have friends do not often feel lonely. However, 41% of respondents who state that they do not have friends sometimes or often feel lonely.

    Ever feel lonely? (only   respondents who stated that they do not have friends)

    Frequency

    Percentage of total

    No, not often (less than half the time)

    372

    59%

    Sometimes (about half the time)

    155

    24%

    Yes, often feels lonely (more than half the time)

    105

    17%

    Total

    632

    100%

     

    The following table demonstrates whether the respondent can date if he/she wants to. Almost 20% of respondents cannot date if they want to.

    Can you date?

    Frequency

    Percentage of total

    No

    1094

    17%

    Yes, but there are some restrictions/rules about dating

    1133

    18%

    Yes, can date or is married/living with partner

    4049

    65%

    Total

    6276

    100%

     

    Valentine’s day is a good time to think about friendship and relationships. Everyone deserves camaraderie if they want it.  

    Please note: The 2011-12 data reports will be released and placed on the NCI website this Spring.  For more in depth analysis of previous year’s NCI consumer survey data, please see http://www.nationalcoreindicators.org.

  • The recent storm in the North East dropped two to three feet of snow across the region. Three days later, getting to work was difficult for everyone. Many driveways weren’t plowed, the sidewalks were slippery, and buses and subways weren’t running on time. That got us thinking about how snow might impede the transportation of those surveyed by NCI. We decided to take a closer look at what the 2011-2012 Consumer Survey data show about mobility and transportation of individuals with ID/DD.

    The following table demonstrates the mobility of survey respondents:

    Mobility

    N

    Percentage of Total

    Moves self around   environment without aids

    9216

    76.2%

    Moves self around   environment with aids or uses wheelchair independently

    1714

    14.2%

    Non-ambulatory, always needs   assistance

    1134

    9.4%

    Don’t know

    23

    0.2%

    Total

    12087

    100%


    About three quarters of survey respondents move themselves around without the use of aids of any sort, while 14% use aids independently. Approximately 10% of respondents are fully non-ambulatory and need assistance moving at all times.

    The following table demonstrates how survey respondents get where they need to go. The percentages will not add up to 100%, because respondents often named several types of transport they used. Also, for the purposes of this blog post, any differences by type of mobility have not been analyzed for statistical significance.

    Mobility

    Transfers self

    Ride from family or friends

    Ride from staff in staff’s car

    Ride from staff in provider vehicle

    Public transport

    Specialized transport

    Taxi

    Don’t know/
      unclear response

    Moves self around   environment without aids

    16.5%

    41.5%

    27.1%

    43.2%

    12.2%

    8.2%

    3.2%

    12.5%

    Moves self around   environment with aids or uses wheelchair independently

    6.9%

    30.3%

    20.5%

    49.9%

    7.3%

    11.7%

    1.9%

    18.5%

    Non-ambulatory, always needs   assistance

    0.7%

    21.9%

    9.8%

    30.7%

    2.0%

    9.8%

    0.3%

    45.0%

     
    From the above table we can see that a large portion of respondents of all mobility levels use provider-provided transportation to get where they are going. Slightly fewer respondents state that they receive transportation from family or friends. Comparatively, very few respondents take a taxi, while slightly more take public transport and/or specialized transport.

    Getting where you need to go is difficult for everyone after a huge snowstorm like Nemo. But as we clean our driveways and front walks, it is important to consider the movement of people of all mobility abilities.

     

    Please note: The 2011-12 data reports will be released and placed on the NCI website this Spring.  For more in depth analysis of previous year’s NCI consumer survey data, please see http://www.nationalcoreindicators.org.

     

     

  • We at NCI periodically produce data briefs to bring attention to interesting trends and phenomena that we see in the data. These data briefs can be used to support policy-making and advocacy efforts within the states. In addition, these briefs can be used to further our knowledge about a specific population and their experience of state services.

    Our most recent data brief uses data from the 2010-2011 administration of NCI to discuss the population of NCI respondents who utilize psychotropic medication.

    NCI asks about the utilization of four types of medication: those prescribed for mood disorders, those prescribed for anxiety problems, those prescribed for psychotic disorders and those prescribed for behavior challenges. Of the total NCI sample, 53% took a medication to address at least one of the above conditions. Notably, 38% of those taking medications were prescribed medications to address a mood disorder. In addition, of those taking medications, 14% were taking medications to address all four conditions listed above.

    We encourage you to look at the data brief to see more in depth analysis and discussion. The data brief can be accessed here: http://www.nationalcoreindicators.org/upload/core-indicators/Psych_NCI_Data_Brief_final.pdf

    Additional data briefs can be seen at the bottom of the “Reports” page on our website. http://www.nationalcoreindicators.org/resources/reports/

    Please let me know if you have any ideas for interesting data brief topics. Email me at dhiersteiner@hsri.org